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Dr. Musa, Physician will be missed

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While playing tennis on Thursday evening on 7th July, 1994; Dr. Musa was stricken and on the spot, he breathed his last. It was the shocking news to all his own and numerous own like. His passing away was like the Sunset at Noon as he was to complete his 41 years on 25th Instant.anmusa.jpg

The Times News of July 11, 1994 offered tributes to the Late Dr. Musa with coverage of the above titled Report as follows:

“The news of the death of Dr. Alimohmad Musa, a staff physician of Palmerton Hospital, spread rapidly through the area on Friday. Dr. Musa, only 41, died from a heart attack while playing tennis on Thursday.

To many people, Dr. Musa was more than merely a physician. Patients attest that when they went to see him, he treated them special. No matter how busy he got, he never rushed patients out of his office. He answered questions in simple language that his patients understood, he explained all procedures, and he was always sympathetic to the patients’ fears and concerns. When a patient died, Dr. Musa was one of the first people to personally phone and offer sympathy to the family. He displayed characteristics we so often associate with the old-time doctors; good traits which appear to be rapidly disappearing.

He joined the staff of Palmerton Hospital in 1985. Peter Kern, hospital administrator, stated Dr. Musa will be mourned by fellow doctors, hospital staff, and friends. Kern added, “The loss will be felt most by many patients who have come to know him as a kind, caring, and compassionate physician.”

Dr. Musa’s practice wasn’t confined to Palmerton Hospital. He had his own office along Delaware Avenue in Palmerton. He regularly visited the Mahoning Valley Nursing and Convalescent Center and cared for patients there. His mild-mannered disposition as well as his ability to show compassion and understanding to his patients was one of his most glaring mannerisms. In a society where people are always in rush, this wasn’t so with Dr. Musa. He was a family man. He loved his family and never hesitated to talk about his wife and children when patients asked about them.

Not only did Dr. Musa take good care of his patients, he took good care of himself. He was tall, slim, and seemingly the picture of health. But tragedy did strike. While Dr. Musa was engaging in physical activity, a heart attack stole his life and robbed his family and his patients of one of the most decent, caring individuals you would ever want to meet. It will be hard for Dr. Musa’s shoes to be filled.

The patients who were treated by Dr. Musa are fortunate that they at least got to know him for a while; that they were able to enjoy the positive qualities he always emitted. Indeed, Dr. Musa was a very special person; one who will be remembered for the kindness and care he showed to his patients, his friends, his family, and his co-workers.

He will be missed. “

Edward J. Miller, M.D., President of Palmerton Hospital, expressed his feelings towards the Late’s family in these words:

“While vacationing in Virginia on Thursday, July 7, as my family and I were drifting near sleep at 11:00, the phone in our hotel room rang and as I got up to answer the phone I knew that something was wrong and that no one would have called us if there hadn’t been a problem. The last thing I was expected to hear was the tragic news about our colleague, Dr. Musa. After, Joy and I shed many tears in disbelief, a sleepless night followed. For the eight years that I had known Dr. Musa I did respect him as a colleague and most certainly remember him as gentle giant.

Gentle in the sense that he was truly a gentleman and giant in that he embodied and encompassed an intelligent, caring, and giving physician. I reflected that night of the many long hours on call, the endless nights in the hospital with little thanks, thanks only known to that of a physician. Ali had the presence of mind in the time of crisis and compassion in the time of defeat. Tragically, when he was enjoying his new home, and when he talked constantly of his children; a strange and cruel fate, death came to him.”

Further, by quoting a verse, he added, “However, we must remember that our lives were touched by a sensitive man who by his memories leaves us with a bit of light of help lift the darkness that we all feel. Here among us he had flourished and among us as a beautiful, strong young man died. If in the comfort of years to go by we look back and remember the tragic death of a young physician we knew then we will diminish Dr. Musa’s brief existence to just that. Rather, we must keep Ali alive in our memories in the things that we do and remember his laughter, his smile, his favorite things, and who he was and by doing so Ali will stay young and alive for many years to come.”

Afterwards, on behalf of the Medical staff, Dr. Miller announced to raise Dr. Ali Musa Memorial Fund at the Hospital and to place a plaque (tablet of metal) in an appropriate location in his memories.

Lastly, with a heavy heart, I shall quote few words of the Late’s patients – Richard Seidof and Bob (his wife) – “I thought some day, he would be by my bed; but, unexpectantly, he had gone first. Taking my aspirin a day, it reminds me of Dr. Musa – a fine and wonderful gentleman that came from India to be a doctor, and that he was in his prime; but suddenly was taken from his beloved family, friends and patients.”

Summing up, Sympathy is greater than gold. Gold comes from the earth, but sympathy comes from heaven. Heaven is above the earth and that is why sympathy is greater than gold. ( From an English Poem).

Here, I put an end of the story of the Late Dr. Alimohmad Musa spread over three continuous blogs, with assurance of many more William’s Tales to share with in future on various subjects.

Valibhai Musa
Dtd. 23rd May, 2007

 
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Posted by on May 27, 2007 in લેખ, Humanity, Life, MB, Report

 

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